The Walking Dead – New Best Friends Review

The Walking Dead enters it’s fantasy phase

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By Jay Hunter This was the week that The Walking Dead really shed it’s skin. A show that once had more in common with a post-apocalyptic anthology, only metamorphose into a showcase of brutality and torture, emerged from it’s chrysalis as a bizarre Mad Max-esque zombie show.

These are the three phases of The Walking Dead in it’s seven year runtime. Make no mistake about it, we are now firmly in fantasyland. A world where Kings and tigers rule, zombies have battle armour and tribes forge alliances to take down warlords. But i’m strangely okay with it.

This weeks episode opened – ironically – with the group trying to escape a huge dump. While searching for a missing Father Gabriel, Rick and his group encounter a mysterious collective, its inhabitants unlike any they have come across. Once again, Rick attempts a call to arms with a new group only for talks to breakdown. The garbage-pail leader pushes Rick into her – more literal – rubbish version of the Rancor pit from Return of the Jedi. Emerging from the trash rustles a walker, so painfully created in order to sell Pop Funko toys it’s laughable. Admittedly, the Mouth of Sauron walker looks cool, but it has no place in The Walking Dead. Dispatching the zombie with a mountain of bin-bags, Rick proves his worth and so a tentative relationship is formed.

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The episodes best scene however didn’t involve spilling guts, but a touching conversation between Rick and Carol. As subsequently pointed out by the pacifist Morgan, Daryl could have awoken Carol’s inner demons by revealing to her that Negan had brutally murdered Glenn (and to a lesser extent Abraham, Spencer and Olivia). In turn forcing The Kingdom into war by sheer will. However, with Daryl exposing his softer side, he lied saying everyone was fine. It was a sweet moment that shows just how much Daryl cares about Carol’s feelings.

The contrast in these two scenes prove that the show seems to now be splatting anything it can against the wall and seeing what sticks. There was genuine human-drama in the chemistry between Daryl and Carol, but the battle armour zombie will no doubt be a profitable toy as The Walking Dead is now coming across as a show written by children, for children. The question is, will the fanbase be okay with that?

The Walking Dead Midseason Premiere Proves it’s Failing

The Walking Dead finally bends to peer pressure

By Jay Hunter Straight out the gate, I feel I need to state I didn’t dislike this weeks episode of The Walking Dead. In fact, I rather enjoyed it. But it wasn’t the show that we all used to love. Dramatic tension and bite-sized character arcs have been replaced with poorly executed grand narratives and ridiculous set-pieces. Instead of figuring out how to get a zombie out of a well or finding a gas canister, we are now preoccupied with a world – strangely – filled with humans, waging war upon one another.

Unlike a lot of critics, I’ve always been quite fond of The Walking Dead, even if I despise the way it treats it’s more enthusiastic fans. But it’s never been a truly brilliant show. If it ever got close to that statue, it was post-Governor when the show became short stories and arcs set throughout the zombie campaign. In saying that, The Walking Dead’s hardcore fanbase, could simply shrug off criticism by using it’s mammoth ratings as a shield. That is, until season seven’s brutal and divisive premiere, when people tuned out. The coveted 18-49 demographic left in droves as ratings fell by 40 percent.

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After leaving fans hanging for seven months, millions of people tuned in to see who’s brains would be left hanging on warlord Negan’s bat. Billed as an endurance test, the sheer brutality on screen was – for some people – akin to the sadistic Red Wedding episode of Game of Thrones. In a huge miscalculation however, The Walking Dead focused on the antagonist’s glee instead of the pain of the antagonists – like Game of Thrones. The Walking Dead revelled in Negan as the star of the show, stretching over the episodes runtime, the whole episode was executed similar to that of a male power-trip. We lingered on the erotic – brutality as Lucile – Negan’s phallic baseball bat – was shoved in our faces. For nearly forty minutes we focused on low-angled shorts staring up at Negan as he paraded around a group of terrified hostages.

Many people have described The Walking Dead as a ‘bad relationship series’ and the premiere was the epitome of that statement. A show that treats you like dirt for weeks, leading you on and teasing you with good, only to finally deliver it just as you’re about to drop it. Before backing up and repeating the process again.

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Which leads me to the midseason premiere.  For the first time in it’s unwavering punishment of it’s audience, The Walking Dead relented and gave in to fan pressure. In an uncharacteristically wooden episode, Rick and co managed to traverse the universes ‘treacherous’ landscape, in order to visit a multitude of different communities and convince them to fight in one – comparatively – fast paced episode.

After spending half a season deciding whether or not it was a smart movie to rebel against Negan’s iron fist, our ragtag hero’s visit the Kingdom, asking for King Ezekiel’s aid. Naturally, the leader is hesitant about going to war and risking the welfare of his people. Daryl responds – likely because the writers need him to sound like a tough badass every now and then – “You call yourself a damn king! You sure as hell don’t act like one!”.  A ridiculous response to a man who doesn’t want to impulsively rush off to help a dilapidated clan of outsiders wage war on the Saviours.

Clearly The Walking Dead is now a show that has lost any sense of nuance. Consider the scene that surprisingly turns out to be the weeks most fascinating. Rick and friends discover a blocked-off road on a recon mission. The barricade, they discover also doubles up as an explosive trap laid by the Saviors. In need of weapons and explosives, they carefully dismantle it, as a gigantic herd of zombies hurdles toward them.

When it transpires that the group are slowly moving the vehicle’s – just so they can put them back again – the sequence feels like a metaphor for the few seasons. However, we slowly build upon that plot, by adding layers to the scene. First they need to move the cars without alerting the saviours, then they need the bombs without them exploding, then the walkers are getting close, then they need to escape. A clear goal, with escalating pressure. Simple storytelling.

It’s also a segway into an over the top action sequence. Upon fortuitous inspection, Rick and Michonne drive two cars in tandem, with a tensile cable linked between. Dissecting the heard in an explosion of blood and gore. A brilliant set-piece – but one – that betrays all the gritty realism we’ve become accustomed to over the course of it’s seven year runtime.

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Upon their return back to Alexandria, Rick and a handful of others go out to find Gabriel and his plot-device. This leads to the group being surrounded yet again by another community. For a world that was so sparsely populated a few years ago, the human race sure have repopulated fast.

Who knows who they are, odds will be they won’t like Rick either. But it’s okay, in a few more episodes they’ll find a safe haven once again – at least for a while.

 

BAFTA 2017: La La Land & Arrival Bag Awards as Nocturnal Animals Disappoints

I, Daniel Blake, Manchester by the Sea & Moonlight are also up for awards

By Jay Hunter The 70th BAFTA ceremony took place tonight. Unsurprisingly, La La Land leads the way for the “British Oscars” after a record breaking Golden Globes with 11 nominations. However, Arrival and Nocturnal Animals were both hot on the musical’s heels with 9 nominations apiece. Unsurprisingly Ken Loach’s British movie I, Daniel Blake also received plaudits. Below are the winners of the night.

Best film

Arrival
I, Daniel Blake
La La Land (Winner)
Manchester by the Sea
Moonlight

Best British film

American Honey
Denial
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
I, Daniel Blake (Winner)
Notes on Blindness
Under the Shadow

Best debut by a British writer, director or producer 

The Girl With All the Gifts – Mike Carey (writer), Camille Gatin (producer)
The Hard Stop – George Amponsah (writer/director/producer), Dionne Walker (writer/producer)
Notes on Blindness – Peter Middleton (writer/director/producer), James Spinney (writer/director), Jo-Jo Ellison (producer)
The Pass – John Donnelly (writer), Ben A Williams (director)
Under the Shadow – Babak Anvari (writer/director), Emily Leo, Oliver Roskill, Lucan Toh (producers) (Winner)

Best film not in the English language

Dheepan
Julieta
Mustang
Son of Saul (Winner)
Toni Erdmann

Best documentary

13th (Winner)
The Beatles: Eight Days a Week – The Touring Years
The Eagle Huntress
Notes on Blindness
Weiner

Best animated film

Finding Dory
Kubo and the Two Strings (Winner)
Moana
Zootropolis

Best director

Denis Villeneuve (Arrival)
Ken Loach (I, Daniel Blake)
Damien Chazelle (La La Land) (Winner)
Kenneth Lonergan (Manchester by the Sea)
Tom Ford (Nocturnal Animals)

Best original screenplay

Hell or High Water
I, Daniel Blake
La La Land
Manchester by the Sea (Winner)
Moonlight

Best adapted screenplay

Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge
Hidden Figures
Lion (Winner)
Nocturnal Animals

Best actor

Andrew Garfield (Hacksaw Ridge)
Casey Affleck (Manchester by the Sea) (Winner)
Jake Gyllenhaal (Nocturnal Animals)
Ryan Gosling (La La Land)
Viggo Mortensen (Captain Fantastic)

Best actress

Amy Adams (Arrival)
Emily Blunt (The Girl on the Train)
Emma Stone (La La Land) (Winner)
Meryl Streep (Florence Foster Jenkins)
Natalie Portman (Jackie)

Best supporting actor

Aaron Taylor-Johnson (Nocturnal Animals)
Dev Patel (Lion) (Winner)
Hugh Grant (Florence Foster Jenkins)
Jeff Bridges (Hell or High Water)
Mahershala Ali (Moonlight)

Best supporting actress

Hayley Squires (I, Daniel Blake)
Michelle Williams (Manchester by the Sea)
Naomie Harris (Moonlight)
Nicole Kidman (Lion)
Viola Davis (Fences) (Winner)

Best original music 

Arrival
Jackie
La La Land (Winner)
Lion
Nocturnal Animals

Best cinematography

Arrival
Hell or High Water
La La Land (Winner)
Lion
Nocturnal Animals

Best editing

Arrival
Hacksaw Ridge (Winner)
La La Land
Manchester by the Sea
Nocturnal Animals

Best production design

Doctor Strange
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (Winner)
Hail, Caesar!
La La Land
Nocturnal Animals

Best costume design

Allied
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
Florence Foster Jenkins
Jackie (Winner)
La La Land

Best make up & hair

Doctor Strange
Florence Foster Jenkins (Winner)
Hacksaw Ridge
Nocturnal Animals
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

Best sound

Arrival (Winner)
Deepwater Horizon
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
Hacksaw Ridge
La La Land

Best special visual effects

Arrival
Doctor Strange
Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them
The Jungle Book (Winner)
Rogue One: A Star Wars Story

EE Rising Star award

Anya Taylor-Joy
Laia Costa
Lucas Hedges
Ruth Negga
Tom Holland (Winner)

Santa Clarita Diet – Review

A feast of fun and flesh

By Jay Hunter Question, what would happen if you took conventional Americana housewife comedy ala Cougar Town and threw a bucket load of gore at it? Answer, Santa Clarita Diet. The Drew Barrymore led Netflix original series is quite the conundrum, managing to be both highly formulaic and totally original all at once.

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Shelia (Barrymore) and Joel (Scream 2’s, Timothy Olyphant) star as the real-estate couple who’s suburban lives are thrown into chaos as Sheila – without explanation – becomes a zombie, by way of profuse vomiting. The upside is, Sheila is now more adventurous and energetic, the downside is she wants to eat human beings.

It would be easy to judge Santa Clarita Diet by it’s cover, becoming another property that neuters horrors most beloved creatures; the same vein as Twilight and Warm Bodies. But the show plays the material so tongue-in-cheek, whilst not shying away from the blood and guts it’s hard not to love it. The show takes note from 90s proto-dark humour but also interesting shades from Showtimes, Dexter. As Sheila’s appetite evolves from simply graving raw beef into living-breathing human flesh, both her and Joel team up to kill – their targets being “the prototype would be young, single Hitler” type.

The effect of a monster finding home in a placid community is one that’s been explored often in comedic horror – think Edward Scissorhands. And of course, not all the jokes hit home, but with the sheer volume delivered from the cast it’s easy to shrug off some of the more eye-rolling pop culture references. The material works best when Olyphant and Barrymore are on screen, such is there insatiable chemistry, but Santa Clarita does a great job of portioning out the undead arrival effect on other characters too – Liv Hewson as Sheila and Joel’s daughter, Abbey is a particularly great addition. The series unfortunately ends on a gambling cliffhanger instead of wrapping things up nicely, but there’s no denying a second series wouldn’t be welcomed.

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The Walking Dead is Toning Down on Violence…and People Don’t Like it

“Next season on The Walking Dead kittens and rainbows”

By Jay Hunter Say what you like about The Walking Dead, but one thing you can’t deny is it doesn’t hold back on the gore. In fact, I once made a pressing argument that the gore in The Walking Dead was a reason why the show was keeping horror relevant.

After a turbulent start to the new season, with steep drop off’s in ratings, the numerous complaints to AMC seems to have finally caved the showrunners. Reported by Variety:

“Walking Dead” exec producer Gale Anne Hurd acknowledged Wednesday that the negative response to the bludgeon slayings of two key characters in the premiere prompted producers to make adjustments in episodes that were still in production at the time of the Oct. 23 season premiere.

“We were able to look at the feedback on the level of violence,” Hurd said during a panel session at the NATPE conference. “We did tone it down for episodes we were still filming for later on in the season.”

“This is not a show that is torture porn,” she added. After the response to the finale, she said they gave strong consideration to making sure “we don’t cross that line.”

Needless to say, fans of the show were furious about the news. Although the show appeals to millions of ‘mainstream’ and passive fans, the core demographic is of course the horror community. Taking to Twitter to voice their opinion to Bloody Disgusting, many fans were outraged:

After this huge shift in their programming, it’s to be expected that the show will be toned down in future seasons. It’s a risky move from the shows producers, which has no doubt rattled their loyal core fanbase, although the show still draws in around 10 million viewers per episode, it will be interesting to see just how many times the show can anger it’s fans and get away with it.

The Walking Dead will return 12th February in the US and the 13th February in the UK

La La Land & The Night Manager Sweep Golden Globes as Meryl Streep Rallies with her Anti-Trump Speech

Just the one award for Manchester by the Sea.

By Jay Hunter The Golden Globes 2017 kicked off awards season last night. The ceremony saw BBC drama The Night Manager walk away with three awards in the television categories, whilst La La Land dominated the movie landscape as many predicted. Elsewhere we saw Aaron Taylor-Johnson pick up best supporting actor for his role in Tom Ford’s Nocturnal Animals and Viola Davis winning best supporting actress for her role in Fences. Much was made about Deadpool‘s chances before the awards, however the night saw the film walk away empty handed. Meryl Streep will claim many of the headlines however, with her rallying speech against Donald Trump in support of foreign people.

Below is the full list of nominees and winners.

 

Best Picture, Drama

“Hacksaw Ridge”
“Hell or High Water”
“Lion”
“Manchester by the Sea”
“Moonlight” – Winner

Best Actor, Drama

Casey Affleck (“Manchester by the Sea”) – Winner
Joe Edgerton (“Loving”)
Andrew Garfield (“Hacksaw Ridge”)
Viggo Mortensen (“Captain Fantastic”)
Denzel Washington (“Fences”)

Best Actress, Drama

Amy Adams (“Arrival”)
Jessica Chastain (“Miss Sloane”)
Isabelle Huppert (“Elle”) – Winner
Ruth Negga (“Loving”)
Natalie Portman (“Jackie”)

Best Picture, Comedy/Musical

“20th Century Women”
“Florence Foster Jenkins”
“Deadpool”
“Sing Street”
“La La Land” – Winner

Best Actor, Comedy/Musical

Colin Farrell (“The Lobster”)
Ryan Gosling (“La La Land”) – Winner
Hugh Grant (“Florence Foster Jenkins”)
Jonah Hill (“War Dogs”)
Ryan Reynolds (“Deadpool”)

Best Actress, Comedy/Musical

Annette Bening (“20th Century Women”)
Lily Collins (“Rules Don’t Apply”)
Hailee Steinfeld (“Edge of Seventeen”)
Emma Stone (“La La Land”) – Winner
Meryl Streep (“Florence Foster Jenkins”)

Best Supporting Actor

Mahershala Ali (“Moonlight”)
Jeff Bridges (“Hell or High Water”)
Simon Helberg (“Florence Foster Jenkins”)
Dev Patel (“Lion”)
Aaron Taylor-Johnson (“Nocturnal Animals”) – Winner

Best Supporting Actress 

Viola Davis (“Fences”) – Winner
Nicole Kidman (“Lion”)
Octavia Spencer (“Hidden Figures”)
Naomie Harris (“Moonlight”)
Michelle Williams (“Manchester by the Sea”)

Best Director

Damien Chazelle (“La La Land”) – Winner
Tom Ford (“Nocturnal Animals”)
Mel Gibson (“Hacksaw Ridge”)
Barry Jenkins (“Moonlight”)
Kenneth Lonergan (“Manchester by the Sea”)

Original Score, Motion Picture

“Moonlight”
“La La Land” – Winner
“Arrival”
“Lion”
“Hidden Figures”

Best Foreign Language Film

“Divines”
“Elle” – Winner
“Neruda”
“The Salesman”
“Toni Erdmann”

Best Animated Film

“Strings”
“Moana”
“My Life as a Zucchini”
“Sing”
“Zootopia” – Winner

Best Screenplay

Damien Chazelle (“La La Land”) – Winner
Tom Ford (“Nocturnal Animals”)
Barry Jenkins (“Moonlight”)
Kenneth Lonergan (“Manchester by the Sea”)
Taylor Sheridan (“Hell or High Water”)

Best Original Song, Motion Picture

“Can’t Stop the Feeling” (“Trolls”)
“City of Stars” (“La La Land”) – Winner
“Faith” (“Sing”)
“Gold” (“Gold”)
“How Far I’ll Go” (“Moana”)

TELEVISION

Best Comedy/Musical

“Atlanta” – Winner
“Black-ish”
“Mozart in the Jungle”
“Transparent”
“Veep”

Best Drama

“The Crown” – Winner
“Game of Thrones”
“Stranger Things”
“This is Us”
“Westworld”

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

“American Crime”
“The Dresser”
“The Night Manager”
“The Night Of”
“The People vs. OJ Simpson” – Winner

Best Actor, Drama

Matthew Rhys (“The Americans”)
Billy Bob Thornton (“Goliath”) – Winner
Rami Malek (“Mr. Robot”)
Bob Odenkirk (“Better Call Saul”)
Liev Schreiber (“Ray Donovan”)

Best Actress, Drama

Caitriona Balfe (“Outlander”)
Claire Foy (“The Crown”) – Winner
Keri Russell (“The Americans”)
Winona Ryder (“Stranger Things”)
Evan Rachel Wood (“Westworld”)

Best Actor, Comedy

Gael Garcia Bernal (“Mozart in the Jungle”)
Anthony Anderson (“Black-ish)
Donald Glover (“Atlanta”) – Winner
Nick Nolte (“Graves”)
Jeffrey Tambor (“Transparent”)

Best Actress, Comedy/Musical

Rachel Bloom (“Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”)
Julia Louis-Dreyfus (“Veep”)
Sarah Jessica Parker (“Divorce”)
Issa Rae (“Insecure”)
Gina Rodriguez (“Jane the Virgin”)
Tracee Ellis Ross (“Black-ish”) – Winner

Best Actor, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Riz Ahmed (“The Night Of”)
Bryan Cranston (“All the Way”)
John Turturro, (“The Night Of”)
Tom Hiddleston, (“The Night Manager) – Winner
Courtney B. Vance, (“The People v. O.J. Simpson”)

Best Actress, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Felicity Huffman (“American Crime”)
Riley Keough (“The Girlfriend Experience”)
Sarah Paulson (“The People v. O.J. Simpson”) – Winner
Charlotte Rampling (“London Spy”)
Kerry Washington (“Confirmation”)

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Limited Series, or Motion Picture Made for Television

Sterling K. Brown (“The People v. O.J. Simpson”)
Hugh Laurie (“The Night Manager”) – Winner
John Lithgow (“The Crown”)
Christian Slater (“Mr. Robot”)
John Travolta (“The People v. O.J. Simpson”)

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Limited Series, or Motion Picture Made for Television

Olivia Colman (“The Night Manager”) – Winner
Lena Headey (“Game of Thrones”)
Chrissy Metz (“The Is Us”)
Mandy Moore (“This Is Us”)
Thandie Newton (“Westworld”)

Golden Globes 2017: Nominees, Times & Host

La La Land and Manchester by the Sea are the critics favourites

By Jay Hunter The Golden Globes, 2017 will be the 74th year for the ceremony, hosted by esteemed talk show host, Jimmy Fallon. The Golden Globes have become more of an indicated for February’s Academy Awards in February in recent years, as the winners of each category often go on to be favourites to win the Oscar and most insiders feel that La La Land and Manchester by the Sea will go head to head for the big honours. Unlike the Academy Awards however, the Golden Globes also award the best television shows of the year with awards. The show is due to start at 8pm ET (around 1am UK time) in the Beverly Hilton, Los Angeles. Below are the nominees.

 

Best Picture, Drama

“Hacksaw Ridge”
“Hell or High Water”
“Lion”
“Manchester by the Sea”
“Moonlight”

Best Actor, Drama

Casey Affleck (“Manchester by the Sea”)
Joe Edgerton (“Loving”)
Andrew Garfield (“Hacksaw Ridge”)
Viggo Mortensen (“Captain Fantastic”)
Denzel Washington (“Fences”)

Best Actress, Drama

Amy Adams (“Arrival”)
Jessica Chastain (“Miss Sloane”)
Isabelle Huppert (“Elle”)
Ruth Negga (“Loving”)
Natalie Portman (“Jackie”)

Best Picture, Comedy/Musical

“20th Century Women”
“Florence Foster Jenkins”
“Deadpool”
“Sing Street”
“La La Land”

Best Actor, Comedy/Musical

Colin Farrell (“The Lobster”)
Ryan Gosling (“La La Land”)
Hugh Grant (“Florence Foster Jenkins”)
Jonah Hill (“War Dogs”)
Ryan Reynolds (“Deadpool”)

Best Actress, Comedy/Musical

Annette Bening (“20th Century Women”)
Lily Collins (“Rules Don’t Apply”)
Hailee Steinfeld (“Edge of Seventeen”)
Emma Stone (“La La Land”)
Meryl Streep (“Florence Foster Jenkins”)

Best Supporting Actor

Mahershala Ali (“Moonlight”)
Jeff Bridges (“Hell or High Water”)
Simon Helberg (“Florence Foster Jenkins”)
Dev Patel (“Lion”)
Aaron Taylor-Johnson (“Nocturnal Animals”)

Best Supporting Actress 

Viola Davis (“Fences”)
Nicole Kidman (“Lion”)
Octavia Spencer (“Hidden Figures”)
Naomie Harris (“Moonlight”)
Michelle Williams (“Manchester by the Sea”)

Best Director

Damien Chazelle (“La La Land”)
Tom Ford (“Nocturnal Animals”)
Mel Gibson (“Hacksaw Ridge”)
Barry Jenkins (“Moonlight”)
Kenneth Lonergan (“Manchester by the Sea”)

Original Score, Motion Picture

“Moonlight”
“La La Land”
“Arrival”
“Lion”
“Hidden Figures”

Best Foreign Language Film

“Divines”
“Elle”
“Neruda”
“The Salesman”
“Toni Erdmann”

Best Animated Film

“Strings”
“Moana”
“My Life as a Zucchini”
“Sing”
“Zootopia”

Best Screenplay

Damien Chazelle (“La La Land”)
Tom Ford (“Nocturnal Animals”)
Barry Jenkins (“Moonlight”)
Kenneth Lonergan (“Manchester by the Sea”)
Taylor Sheridan (“Hell or High Water”)

Best Original Song, Motion Picture

“Can’t Stop the Feeling” (“Trolls”)
“City of Stars” (“La La Land”)
“Faith” (“Sing”)
“Gold” (“Gold”)
“How Far I’ll Go” (“Moana”)

TELEVISION

Best Comedy/Musical

“Atlanta”
“Black-ish”
“Mozart in the Jungle”
“Transparent”
“Veep”

Best Drama

“The Crown”
“Game of Thrones”
“Stranger Things”
“This is Us”
“Westworld”

Best Television Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

“American Crime”
“The Dresser”
“The Night Manager”
“The Night Of”
“The People vs. OJ Simpson”

Best Actor, Drama

Matthew Rhys (“The Americans”)
Billy Bob Thornton (“Goliath)
Rami Malek (“Mr. Robot”)
Bob Odenkirk (“Better Call Saul”)
Liev Schreiber (“Ray Donovan”)

Best Actress, Drama

Caitriona Balfe (“Outlander”)
Claire Foy (“The Crown”)
Keri Russell (“The Americans”)
Winona Ryder (“Stranger Things”)
Evan Rachel Wood (“Westworld”)

Best Actor, Comedy

Gael Garcia Bernal (“Mozart in the Jungle”)
Anthony Anderson (“Black-ish)
Donald Glover (“Atlanta”)
Nick Nolte (“Graves”)
Jeffrey Tambor (“Transparent”)

Best Actress, Comedy/Musical

Rachel Bloom (“Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”)
Julia Louis-Dreyfus (“Veep”)
Sarah Jessica Parker (“Divorce”)
Issa Rae (“Insecure”)
Gina Rodriguez (“Jane the Virgin”)
Tracee Ellis Ross (“Black-ish”)

Best Actor, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Riz Ahmed (“The Night Of”)
Bryan Cranston (“All the Way”)
John Turturro, (“The Night Of”)
Tom Hiddleston, (“The Night Manager)
Courtney B. Vance, (“The People v. O.J. Simpson”)

Best Actress, Limited Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Felicity Huffman (“American Crime”)
Riley Keough (“The Girlfriend Experience”)
Sarah Paulson (“The People v. O.J. Simpson”)
Charlotte Rampling (“London Spy”)
Kerry Washington (“Confirmation”)

Best Supporting Actor in a Series, Limited Series, or Motion Picture Made for Television

Sterling K. Brown (“The People v. O.J. Simpson”)
Hugh Laurie (“The Night Manager”)
John Lithgow (“The Crown”)
Christian Slater (“Mr. Robot”)
John Travolta (“The People v. O.J. Simpson”)

Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Limited Series, or Motion Picture Made for Television

Olivia Colman (“The Night Manager”)
Lena Headey (“Game of Thrones”)
Chrissy Metz (“The Is Us”)
Mandy Moore (“This Is Us”)
Thandie Newton (“Westworld”)